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Dr. Stuart Scott

Dr. Stuart Scott

Senior Lecturer in Sustainable Energy

Fellow of Girton College

Stuart Scott is available for consultancy.


Office Phone: +44 (0)1223 332645

Biography:

  • Meng MA Chemical Engnineering, Cambridge University (2001)
  • PhD in Chemical Engineering, Cambridge University (2001-2004)
  • Research Fellow, Girton College Cambridge (2004-2006)
  • Lecturer in Sustainable Energy, Engineering Department, Cambridge University (2006)

Research themes

Bioenergy:
  • Algal biofuels
  • Sustainability of Energy Systems, including LCA assessments
Hydrocarbon Recovery:
  • Combustion, gasification and pyrolysis
  • Chemical looping combustion
  • Reactor and process modelling
Carbon Capture, Storage & Use:
  • Combustion, gasification and pyrolysis
  • Chemical looping combustion
  • Reactor and process modelling
Sustainable Chemical Conversions:
  • Thermochemical redox cycles for CO2 capture and hydrogen production.

Departments and Institutes

Department of Engineering:

Research Interests

In recent years concern has grown about the use of fossil fuels and the effect of the CO2 they produce on the climate. Biomass and biofuels could be potentially carbon neutral, but there are issues such as land area and lifecycle CO2 emmision which limit their contribution. Fossils fuels will continue to supply the majority of the world's power for the foreseable future. Ways of mitigating their impact include capturing the CO2 ready for sequestration. Our research in this area includes using alternative oxygen carriers (i.e. solids) to burn fuels, rather than air, in a process known as chemical looping and capturing the CO2 using solid sorbents. We are also interested in the processing of biomass and waste products into valuable fuel compounds, with a CO2 foot print signficantly lower than current fossil fuels. Part of this work involves assement of the CO2 release over the lifecycle of the product.

A second strand of work aims to model fluidised systems. In these systems complex two-phase flows of particles and a gas exist. Aside from a fundamental interest in granular flow, these system are often used for to process solid fuels, e.g. gasifiers or combustors. One interest is simulating these flow using e.g. DEM-CFD simulations.

Modelling of reacting systems and processes is important to all aspects of our work, from CFD, and CFD DEM models of fluidised systems, through to lumped parameter models at the system level.

Keywords

  • Photovoltaics

Key Publications

 

  1. Scott. S.A., Dennis J.S., Davidson J.F., Hayhurst A.N. Brown T. (2006). In Situ Gasification of a Solid Fuel and CO2 Separation using Chemical Looping. AICHE J.52, 3325-3328.

  2. Scott, S.A, Dennis, J.S., Davidson, J.F., Hayhurst, A.N. (2007). The devolatilisation of particles of a complex fuel in a fluidised bed. Chem. Eng. Sci, 62, 584-598

  3. Bohn C.D.,  Müller C.R. ,Hayhurst A.N.,  Davidson J.F., Dennis J.S., Scott S.A. (2008). Production of Very Pure Hydrogen with Simultaneous Capture of Carbon Dioxide using the Redox Reactions of Iron Oxides.  Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 47, 7623-7630. doi:10.1021/ie800335j

  4. Stephenson A.L., Dennis J.S., Scott S.A. (2008) Improving the sustainability of the production of biodiesel from oilseed rape in the UK. Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 86, 427-440. doi: 10.1016/j.psep.2008.06.005

  5. Stephenson, A.L. et al., 2010. Life-Cycle Assessment of Potential Algal Biodiesel Production in the United Kingdom: A Comparison of Raceways and Air-Lift Tubular Bioreactors. Energy & Fuels, 24(7), 4062-4077.