skip to content

Energy

Interdisciplinary Research Centre
 
Read more at: Scientists develop fully woven, smart display
Led by researchers at the University of Cambridge - Scientists develop fully woven, smart display

Scientists develop fully woven, smart display

Researchers have developed a 46-inch woven display with smart sensors, energy harvesting and storage integrated directly into the fabric. An international team of scientists have produced a fully woven smart textile display that integrates active electronic, sensing, energy and photonic functions. The functions are...


Read more at: Zero-carbon refrigeration spin-out sets its sights on environmentally-friendly heating systems
Zero-carbon refrigeration spin-out sets its sights on environmentally-friendly heating systems

Zero-carbon refrigeration spin-out sets its sights on environmentally-friendly heating systems

Zero-carbon refrigeration pioneer Barocal has secured a £1.3 million investment to accelerate commercialisation of its novel technology designed to cut global CO₂ emissions. As the technology also works in heating applications, the University of Cambridge spin-out now plans to explore the potential of its breakthrough for...


Read more at: Historic buildings could use solar panels to protect from rising energy costs
News-Historic-buildings-could-use-solar-panels-to-protect-from-rising-energy-costs

Historic buildings could use solar panels to protect from rising energy costs

Installing solar panels could help historic buildings beat the rising costs of energy, according to a new study. Researchers have carried out a feasibility study and found that installing solar panels on the Grade I listed Bath Abbey could save around 10 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, significantly reducing the carbon...


Read more at: New research centre to develop next-generation battery technologies
A newly-established Cambridge research centre will work to develop next-generation batteries and battery materials, one of the major technological hurdles in the transition to a zero-carbon economy.

New research centre to develop next-generation battery technologies

A newly-established Cambridge research centre will work to develop next-generation batteries and battery materials, one of the major technological hurdles in the transition to a zero-carbon economy. The WP-Cambridge Materials Innovation Centre (WP-CAMMIC) will be based at Cambridge’s Department of Materials Science &...


Read more at: The Carbon Challenge: Daily Decaronisation Programme launch
Launch of the challenge to decarbonise our everyday lives Programme 2022

The Carbon Challenge: Daily Decaronisation Programme launch

Competition launch for potgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers to submite scalable ideas to decarbonise activities in our everyday lives. Are you a problem solver who thrives on challenge? Do you want to take action on climate change? The Cambridge Carbon Challenge is an initiative for student and staff teams to...


Read more at: Templating approach stabilises ‘ideal’ material for alternative solar cells
Researchers have developed a method to stabilise a promising material known as perovskite for cheap solar cells, without compromising its near-perfect performance.

Templating approach stabilises ‘ideal’ material for alternative solar cells

Researchers have developed a method to stabilise a promising material known as perovskite for cheap solar cells, without compromising its near-perfect performance. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used an organic molecule as a ‘template’ to guide perovskite films into the desired phase as they form...


Read more at: The Climate Compatible Growth (CCG) programme
This is an ambitious project with many experts aiming to engage countries in the global south modelling, decision-making and capacity building.

The Climate Compatible Growth (CCG) programme

Dr Jonathan Cullen from the Resource Efficiency Collective at the Department of Engineering and Lara Allen from Centre for Global Equality are part of Climate Compatible Growth (CCG) a £38m multi-institutional programme. CCG seek answers to a challenging question: how can we deliver future energy and material services...


Read more at: National Centre for Propulsion and Power gets boost from the Wolfson Foundation
The Centre, based at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory, will play a key role in accelerating the decarbonisation of flight and power generation

National Centre for Propulsion and Power gets boost from the Wolfson Foundation

The Centre, based at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory, will play a key role in accelerating the decarbonisation of flight and power generation Modern aviation and power generation have brought many benefits – connecting people across the world and providing safe, reliable electricity to billions – but rapidly decarbonising...


Read more at: Miniature grinding mill closes in on the details of ‘green’ chemical reactions
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new approach for observing mechanochemical reactions — where simple ingredients are ground up to make new chemical compounds and materials that can be used in anything from the pharmaceutical to t

Miniature grinding mill closes in on the details of ‘green’ chemical reactions

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new approach for observing mechanochemical reactions — where simple ingredients are ground up to make new chemical compounds and materials that can be used in anything from the pharmaceutical to the metallurgical, cement and mineral industries. The study led by...


Read more at: Sustainable, biodegradable glitter – from your fruit bowl
Films of cellulose nanocrystals prepared by the team can be made at scale using roll-to-roll processes like those used to make paper from wood pulp. This is the first time these materials have been fabricated at industrial scale.

Sustainable, biodegradable glitter – from your fruit bowl

Cambridge researchers have developed a sustainable, plastic-free glitter for use in the cosmetics industry – made from the cellulose found in plants, fruits, vegetables and wood pulp. Beyond its general annoyance factor, glitter is made of toxic and unsustainable materials, and contributes to plastic pollution. Now...