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The distributional impact of policy proposals on different groups of GB energy consumers

When Jan 21, 2020
from 12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
Where Keynes Room, 4th Floor of Faculty of Economics
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Speaker: Maureen Paul, Head of Analytical Strategy and Development, Ofgem


Part of the EPRG E&E Seminar series

A fusion power plant — why not

When Jan 22, 2020
from 07:30 PM to 08:30 PM
Where Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Road
Contact Name Tommy Tai
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Speaker: Dr. Justin Ball, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Swiss Plasma Center

 

Talks on nuclear fusion power tend to focus on the possibilities and the promise: a safe, sustainable, non-intermittent, carbon-neutral energy supply. This one will not. Instead we will take a deep dive into the limitations of our own understanding, exploring how what seems to be a classical physics problem has resisted a $60 billion international R&D effort. We will encounter many difficulties. Some will be elegant and pure, like isolated plasma turbulence in a magnetic field, while others will involve the engineering technicalities of fields such as material science and applied superconductivity. Yet, when we intermix all these difficulties and constraints in trying to design a magnetic confinement fusion power plant, we’ll arrive at a conclusion that just might merit some optimism.

About the speaker: Justin Ball is an American scientist studying theoretical plasma physics and nuclear fusion energy. He works at the Swiss Plasma Center, a fusion laboratory within the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. His research primarily focuses on the effect of plasma shaping on turbulence in tokamaks. Additionally, he is an avid fusion science communicator via magazine articles, lectures, and podcasts. In 2019, he and Jason Parisi published a popular science book titled The Future of Fusion Energy.

Harwell Clean Energy Conference

When Jan 23, 2020
from 10:00 AM to 03:00 PM
Where Pickavance Lecture Theatre, RAL RAL Fermi Avenue Harwell OX11 0QX
Contact Name Emma Southwell-Sander
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You are invited to join industry leaders from the UK’s Energy sector at this One-day Clean Energy conference.

Conference Programme

10.00-10.30: Arrival and Registration

10.30-11.30: Speaker Session: Energy Landscape, Government Challenges and Commercial Opportunities

Introduction Emma Southwell- Sander

Speakers: Professor John Loughhead BEIS, Barbara Ghinelli Harwell Campus, Umerah Akram London Stock Exchange, Siobhan Clarke BP, SSE

11.30-11.45: Coffee Break and Networking

11.45-12.30: Panel Discussion with Q&A: How Cross Sector and Multi-Sector Collaboration Will Grow the UK’s Energy Capabilities. Chaired by Ian Ellerington; Faraday Institution. Beverly Gower Jones; BEIS Energy Fund, Alison Kennedy; Hartree Digital, STFC, Jack Nicholson Qdot

12:15-12:30: Closing Remarks (Showcase) Emma Southwell-Sander

12:30-13:30: Networking Lunch New Visitor Centre

13:30-15:00: Cluster Showcase: Collaboration Opportunities. EnergyTec Cluster, HealthTec, Space & Digital Cluster's crossover into Energy

Showcase; Ricardo, Siemens, Reaction Engines, KTN-Innovate, Diamond, Energy Catapult, Oxford Nanosystems, Enersys, Plasma App, UKERC, STFC B4I, Hartree AI, Qdot, Wood Group, i-EM, SiHealth, Oxford City Council, Spottit, Oxford GreenTech, Cambridge Clean Tech, Fuel Cell Systems, Set Squared, PlasmaApp, SSE, UKAEA, Archangel, Subtera, Royal Society of Cryogenics

 

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The economics of BECCS deployment in a 1.5oC or 2oC world

When Jan 28, 2020
from 12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
Where Keynes Room, 4th Floor of Faculty of Economics
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Speaker: Mathilde Fajardy, EPRG, University of Cambridge

Part of EPRG E&E Seminar series

 

Mathilde joined EPRG as a Research Assistant to explore least cost decarbonisation pathways of the heat sector in the UK. She holds undergraduate and Masters’ degrees in Energy Engineering, with a specialisation in heat transfers, from Ecole Centrale Paris (France), and she is currently completing her PhD in Process Systems Engineering and Environmental Policy at Imperial College. At Imperial, Mathilde studied the role of negative emissions in mitigating climate change, with a focus on bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). She has developed a modelling and optimisation framework which quantifies the resource and financial costs of deploying BECCS at scale.

 

Flexibility markets for electricity in Great Britain

When Feb 04, 2020
from 12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
Where Keynes Room, 4th Floor of Faculty of Economics
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Speaker: Randolph Brazier (Energy Networks Association)

Part of the EPRG E&E seminar series

 

Randolph is the Head of Innovation & Development at the Energy Networks Association, and has over seven years of experience in the power and energy sector. Randolph is responsible for co-ordinating and delivering a broad range of strategic industry challenges, including the development of smarter networks via the ENA Open Networks Project, which includes the DSO Transition and other industry objectives. He has previous experience in the design and management of multi-disciplinary power projects in the Transmission & Distribution and renewable generation sectors. These projects were located across the UK, Ireland, Malta and Australia. Randolph has an M.Phil in Engineering for Sustainable Development from the University of Cambridge and has presented a number of conference papers on electrical systems and protection and automation design.

 

The competitive effects of sequential intraday electricity markets: Evidence from Italy

When Feb 11, 2020
from 12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
Where Keynes Room, 4th Floor of Faculty of Economics
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Speaker: Rebecca Ly (EPRG, University of Cambridge)

Part of EPRG E&E seminar series

 

Rebecca is a Research Assistant in the Energy Policy Research Group (EPRG) at the University of Cambridge. She holds a Bachelor degree from the Toulouse School of Economics and a joint Master degree in Economics from Ecole Polytechnique and ENSAE. Prior to  EPRG, she was a Research Assistant at the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics where she worked on projects related to competition and market design in European electricity markets.

 

 

Business model innovation for sustainable development: Lessons from off-grid energy in Sub-Saharan Africa

When Feb 25, 2020
from 12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
Where Keynes Room, 4th Floor of Faculty of Economics
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Speaker: Aoife Haney (University of Oxford)

Part of the EPRG E&E seminar series

 

Aoife’s research focuses on the connections between technological, organisational and institutional change related to sustainability, with a particular interest in new technologies related to energy and buildings.

Her position is a joint one between the Smith School of Enterprise and Environment at the School of Geography and Environment, and Saïd Business School. 

Prior to joining Saïd Business School, Aoife was a senior researcher at the Group for Sustainability and Technology (SusTec) at ETH in Zurich. Aoife received her PhD from the Judge Business School, University of Cambridge and her MA from the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University.

 

Next generation solutions for electrical grid monitoring

When May 21, 2020
from 06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
Where Room LT0, Department of Engineering, Trumpington Street
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Emerging social trends such as the widespread deployment of small-scale solar installations, the adoption of electric vehicles and changing patterns of power generation are putting immense pressure on the UKs electrical grid infrastructure. In order to invest efficiently and minimise consumer bills, the Distribution Network Operators (DNOs) are in a race to upgrade, maintain and replace infrastructure as our demand for energy grows.

Under an Innovate UK grant, 42 Technology opened discussions with 5 DNOs to discover why smart metering of the grid is not being widely adopted. This revealed that the major factors came down to the cost of meters and long disruptions in service during installation. To overcome these problems 42 Technology designed and tested a novel retrofittable low cost secondary substation monitor called ‘FuseOhm’. FuseOhm is a fraction of the cost and takes a fraction of the time to install compared to existing solutions. This presentation will look at how 42 Technology built their FuseOhm substation monitor and walks through the steps they are taking to make the smart grid a reality.

Richard Prudence is an Electronics Engineer and one of the technical leads on the FuseOhm Project. 42 Technology is a Cambridge based technical consultancy focused on solving complex engineering problems and developing next generation products.

Open to all. Full details at https://communities.theiet.org/communities/events/item/229/77/23356 Bookings can be made at https://localevents.theiet.org/493d14

This talk is part of the IET series.

 

 

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