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Materials and Chemistry

Energy-related research in Materials and Chemistry is key focus area in Cambridge and includes work focused on the fundamental synthesis, physics and chemistry of materials, through to the processing of the materials and production of devices.  The Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Engineering and Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology and Materials Science and Metallurgy are particularly active in this area.  Focus areas include:

  • Functional materials, including low cost nanostructured solar cells and light emitting devices and graphene for energy harvesting, conversion, electricity storage and transport
  • Catalysis for fuel cells and sustainable chemical processes
  • Sustainable chemistry, including the efficient use of resources and the development of new catalytic chemical reactions and products for sustainable applications.

The £20 million donation by Mr. David Harding to establish the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability, launched in 2011, will support research programmes that explore basic science which can generate the new technologies and new industries that will be needed to meet the demands of a growing population on our already strained natural resources. The programme will provide studentships, research fellowships, and support for new academic staff as well as investment in research infrastructure of the highest level, pump-priming for novel research projects, support for collaborations within the University and outside. There will be a strong emphasis upon fundamental research that will have importance for the sustainability agenda in the long-term.

Please visit individual faculty profiles to learn more about their research in the Materials and Chemistry theme. The can be contacted to discuss university-wide initiatives and opportunities.

People specializing in this area

Visiting Researchers

Dr Matias Acosta

Develop and synthesis of bulk and thin film electronic ionic conductors for solid-state oxide fuel cells.